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Why You Need Creatine

creatine monohydrate

Creatine is the most-researched food supplement ever.

I've been using creatine on and off for about 20 years now. My first experience with it was amazing. It, along with a two- or three-times a day protein shake, couple with brutal weight workouts, allowed me to pack on 60 pounds of muscle in one year.

At the time, without steroids, the max muscle most guys could build was about 8-12 pounds.

So I considered that a monumental feat.

And I attribute it all to creatine.

Sure, I had to eat a LOT of calories to get myself in a positive caloric balance. Plus, I had to train really heavy.

But a lot of that weight was strictly because creatine allowed me to work harder, push and pull more, and recover a lot faster.

You could say, at least for me, creatine was a poor man's steroid.

And for a lot of guys, it is.

I didn't have the time, money, or inclination to inject myself with God-knows-what that I got from a gym rat. And I couldn't find a doctor at the time who'd prescribe them to me. And I sure as hell wasn't going to drive or fly down to Mexico or Canada to smuggle it back in.

I started doing research on it. And so did a lot of people in the supplement and scientific world.

In fact, creatine is the most-researched supplement – EVER.

There's a reason – it works.

But people are skeptical. Of course.

I mean, most supplements don't live up to the hype. And some can really harm you – even kill you.

Creatine isn't like that at all.

It's a natural molecule found in animal flesh like beef. We store in our bodies.

I won't get into all the technical details, but suffice it to say many athletes, strength athletes specifically, use it and swear by it.

Want to learn more about the research and how to use it for maximum results?

Free report

Get the Creatine Report here.

Supplement Scams

road-sign-464653_1280

Supplement Scam Alert! Read here about supplement scams the food supplement industry does not want you to know about (because if you did, they'd go broke and you'd make some gains!).

Think about it for a minute: If all those nutritional supplements worked, then why don't we all look like [insert hottest body on the planet right now – examples might be Dexter Jackson, Brad Pitt, or Megan Fox]?

Why don't food supplements work? Here's a key question in seeking out that answer: How could the supplement industry stay in business if they did?

Here's the lowdown on the supplement scams the food companies run on you every time you open up a fitness-, health-, or muscle-building magazine.

Did you know that all the fitness-related magazines were either controlled, owned, or heavily influenced by the supplement industry? Look it up. Advertising is big business and there's no bigger business in the health-related magazine industry than food supplements.

Muscle&Fitness sells nothing but supplement ads, many of which are promoting Joe Weider's own supplement line. Here's an excerpt from an ad in the July 2009 edition of Flex Magazine (another Weider publication):

New Super-Molecule is 2,000 Times More Potent Than Anything You've Ever Taken!

Is that hyperbole? Yes, absolutely. Does it sell? YES! ABSOLUTELY!!

You're not in this game to get 5 -10 percent gains. You want 2,000 percent gains!

SUPPLEMENT SCAM #1: If it seems to good to be true, it probably is.

Choking down a pill or mixing up a powder is far easier than hitting the gym, running up stairs, and eating healthy food. That's why people take supplements, for the most part. It's for the magic elixir, the instant gratification.

Don't get me wrong: Some supplements DO work. But they aren't miracle workers. None of them will do what anabolic steroids do, either. Some claim to have “anabolic effect.” But so does steak and eggs, heavy weight training, and steroids.

The supplement companies have a vested interest in keeping you from reaching your peak. Think about it: If you “became” Ronnie Coleman by taking Supplement X, then, when you got there, wouldn't you stop?

If a drug cured you of cancer, you surely would stop taking it once your cancer was in remission.

If you got to your goal weight of 330 pounds of rock-solid monster muscle, would you keep taking your weight-gain powder?

If you lost 100 pounds and looked the best you ever looked, would losing 120 pounds make you happier? You'd have to keep taking the supplement forever and, soon, you'd be dead, weighing a whopping 37 pounds!

So, supplements have to give the appearance of working, yet they simply cannot deliver on their promise, or else they'd go out of business. Hence, the supplement scams!

In the latest edition of Flex, page 38 had the first “editorial content.” Guess what was on the first 37 pages? Supplement advertisements. I'm not kidding.

SUPPLEMENT SCAM #2: If you have to “sell it” that strong, it's probably too good to be true!

Here's another trick the supplement industry uses to sell their “goods” (we should call them “bads” in this case): They take a bodybuilder, have him “bulk up” (i.e., get fat), then have him take their supplement while he works his arse off in the gym and eats like a concentration camp victim.

“Miraculously,” the dude trims down, loses 10 percent body fat and gains 10 pounds of muscle, all in “less than 28 days!”

What a crock! First, they took somebody who had already “been there,” and took him “back there.” That's too easy. Give me ANY pro-caliber athlete and in 3 months' time, I can have him looking like he used to look. It's simple.

Arthur Jones did this 40 years ago with his Nautilus training machines. He took a young Casey Viator who had been in a car accident, after having been crowned the youngest Mr America ever, and “transformed” him using the Nautilus method (high intensity, single sets per body part, isolation exercises, training to failure, etc.).

Casey could start training today and get back to 80 percent of his best shape in 3 months!

SUPPLEMENT SCAM #3: Beware the “Before-After” photo scam.

The supplement guys also strategically place “testimonials” next to the “Before-After” photos (or outright lie about it) to imply that THOSE models gave the glowing review.

Also beware the “phony review,” where an internet marketer is selling supplements by giving an “objective review” of a product. Most likely, he's getting paid for any sales of the product made through his page. It's called “affiliate marketing” and the FCC is about to crack down on this practice.

(By the way, I do the same thing here on these pages, but I only sell what I take myself and I only take what works.)

Another thing you may not be aware of: Nutritional supplements are not regulated or tested by any government entity. Manufacturers can claim nearly anything. Further, they can put just about ANYTHING in their products!

Did you know that? Here's a line for a product called “EPONOX.”

NEW EPO Blood Building Technology for Extreme Muscle Growth

Does that sound a little scary to you? It certainly does to me! Basically, if this stuff does what it says it does (which it probably doesn't), you will be manipulating your body to build more red blood cells than it would naturally manufacture. Athletes call this “blood doping.” Lance Armstrong, 7-time Tour de France winner, was accused of blood doping through use of drugs that boosted EPO output.

(My take, by the way: He did use drugs, but only while in cancer treatment, but not while competing. I have no proof of this, other than the fact that he never failed a drug test while competing, and he was placed under far more scrutiny than any of his competitors.)

Not only are the proposed benefits of such blood-boosting dubious, they can be harmful! Imagine more blood coursing through your veins. Your blood pressure will rise, more stress will be placed on your heart pumping all that blood around. Remember, you cannot compress a fluid, so what happens is, if taken to extremes, your blood vessel walls get thinner. Not a good thing!

However, it's highly doubtful that this supplement delivers on its “promise.” But if it did, I'd run away from this supplement. Nothing long-term-good can come of it.

Finally, a word on ephedrine. Lots of “fat burners” have used this chemical compound, or a derivative, for years. A handful of people have died while taking supplements containing ephedrine. The FDA finally pulled it off the shelves. It's now a banned substance.

While I'm skeptical that the root cause of these deaths was due to ephedrine, I remain unconvinced that you cannot get similar results with — get this — HARD WORK.

I know, it's tough to get all excited about working in the gym and eating well. But it remains the best long-term method for building the body you want. It works. And it won't kill you.

Some of the stuff they put in food supplements is downright scary. Putting untested ingredients is not only part of the supplement scam, but it ought to be a crime.

As I alluded to before, there are supplements that work. You can find them here (it's a really short read).

You don't need fancy “blends” or “optimized” proportions. You certainly don't need the multi-color, multi-page “Special Advertisements” hawking such hyperbole.

And you certainly don't need the outrageous prices.

2

Homemade Supplement Secrets Review

This is my second review of a Jeff Anderson product, and just like the last product I reviewed, Optimum Anabolics, Homemade Supplement Secrets is an overwhelming hit!

This book is chock-full of nutritional information. Jeff dispels a lot of myths about nutrition and supplementation and he really takes the supplement industry to task for the deceptive practices that some of the players engage in. Jeff also lays it all out in terms of ingredients in popular supplements in several categories (like “Mass Gainers,” “Fat Burners,” and “Hormone Boosters,” just to name a few) and tells you the exact quantities of each beneficial ingredient to put in your own, homemade recipes.

You will learn a lot from this book. There’s a lot of science here, but it’s all put out in layman’s terms that anybody can understand and comprehend. Better yet, everything you learn will be actionable! In no time flat, you’ll be making your own supplements at a fraction of the cost in the store, and you may even be making a more effective concoction (Jeff tells you which ingredients aren’t necessary in the popular formulations).

Supplement Scams

road-sign-464653_1280

Supplement Scam Alert! Read here about supplement scams the food supplement industry does not want you to know about (because if you did, they'd go broke and you'd make some gains!).

Think about it for a minute: If all those nutritional supplements worked, then why don't we all look like [insert hottest body on the planet right now – examples might be Dexter Jackson, Brad Pitt, or Megan Fox]?

Why don't food supplements work? Here's a key question in seeking out that answer: How could the supplement industry stay in business if they did?

Here's the lowdown on the supplement scams the food companies run on you every time you open up a fitness-, health-, or muscle-building magazine.

Did you know that all the fitness-related magazines were either controlled, owned, or heavily influenced by the supplement industry? Look it up. Advertising is big business and there's no bigger business in the health-related magazine industry than food supplements.

Muscle&Fitness sells nothing but supplement ads, many of which are promoting Joe Weider's own supplement line. Here's an excerpt from an ad in the July 2009 edition of Flex Magazine (another Weider publication):

New Super-Molecule is 2,000 Times More Potent Than Anything You've Ever Taken!

Is that hyperbole? Yes, absolutely. Does it sell? YES! ABSOLUTELY!!

You're not in this game to get 5 -10 percent gains. You want 2,000 percent gains!

SUPPLEMENT SCAM #1: If it seems to good to be true, it probably is.

Choking down a pill or mixing up a powder is far easier than hitting the gym, running up stairs, and eating healthy food. That's why people take supplements, for the most part. It's for the magic elixir, the instant gratification.

Don't get me wrong: Some supplements DO work. But they aren't miracle workers. None of them will do what anabolic steroids do, either. Some claim to have “anabolic effect.” But so does steak and eggs, heavy weight training, and steroids.

The supplement companies have a vested interest in keeping you from reaching your peak. Think about it: If you “became” Ronnie Coleman by taking Supplement X, then, when you got there, wouldn't you stop?

If a drug cured you of cancer, you surely would stop taking it once your cancer was in remission.

If you got to your goal weight of 330 pounds of rock-solid monster muscle, would you keep taking your weight-gain powder?

If you lost 100 pounds and looked the best you ever looked, would losing 120 pounds make you happier? You'd have to keep taking the supplement forever and, soon, you'd be dead, weighing a whopping 37 pounds!

So, supplements have to give the appearance of working, yet they simply cannot deliver on their promise, or else they'd go out of business. Hence, the supplement scams!

In the latest edition of Flex, page 38 had the first “editorial content.” Guess what was on the first 37 pages? Supplement advertisements. I'm not kidding.

SUPPLEMENT SCAM #2: If you have to “sell it” that strong, it's probably too good to be true!

Here's another trick the supplement industry uses to sell their “goods” (we should call them “bads” in this case): They take a bodybuilder, have him “bulk up” (i.e., get fat), then have him take their supplement while he works his arse off in the gym and eats like a concentration camp victim.

“Miraculously,” the dude trims down, loses 10 percent body fat and gains 10 pounds of muscle, all in “less than 28 days!”

What a crock! First, they took somebody who had already “been there,” and took him “back there.” That's too easy. Give me ANY pro-caliber athlete and in 3 months' time, I can have him looking like he used to look. It's simple.

Arthur Jones did this 40 years ago with his Nautilus training machines. He took a young Casey Viator who had been in a car accident, after having been crowned the youngest Mr America ever, and “transformed” him using the Nautilus method (high intensity, single sets per body part, isolation exercises, training to failure, etc.).

Casey could start training today and get back to 80 percent of his best shape in 3 months!

SUPPLEMENT SCAM #3: Beware the “Before-After” photo scam.

The supplement guys also strategically place “testimonials” next to the “Before-After” photos (or outright lie about it) to imply that THOSE models gave the glowing review.

Also beware the “phony review,” where an internet marketer is selling supplements by giving an “objective review” of a product. Most likely, he's getting paid for any sales of the product made through his page. It's called “affiliate marketing” and the FCC is about to crack down on this practice.

(By the way, I do the same thing here on these pages, but I only sell what I take myself and I only take what works.)

Another thing you may not be aware of: Nutritional supplements are not regulated or tested by any government entity. Manufacturers can claim nearly anything. Further, they can put just about ANYTHING in their products!

Did you know that? Here's a line for a product called “EPONOX.”

NEW EPO Blood Building Technology for Extreme Muscle Growth

Does that sound a little scary to you? It certainly does to me! Basically, if this stuff does what it says it does (which it probably doesn't), you will be manipulating your body to build more red blood cells than it would naturally manufacture. Athletes call this “blood doping.” Lance Armstrong, 7-time Tour de France winner, was accused of blood doping through use of drugs that boosted EPO output.

(My take, by the way: He did use drugs, but only while in cancer treatment, but not while competing. I have no proof of this, other than the fact that he never failed a drug test while competing, and he was placed under far more scrutiny than any of his competitors.)

Not only are the proposed benefits of such blood-boosting dubious, they can be harmful! Imagine more blood coursing through your veins. Your blood pressure will rise, more stress will be placed on your heart pumping all that blood around. Remember, you cannot compress a fluid, so what happens is, if taken to extremes, your blood vessel walls get thinner. Not a good thing!

However, it's highly doubtful that this supplement delivers on its “promise.” But if it did, I'd run away from this supplement. Nothing long-term-good can come of it.

Finally, a word on ephedrine. Lots of “fat burners” have used this chemical compound, or a derivative, for years. A handful of people have died while taking supplements containing ephedrine. The FDA finally pulled it off the shelves. It's now a banned substance.

While I'm skeptical that the root cause of these deaths was due to ephedrine, I remain unconvinced that you cannot get similar results with — get this — HARD WORK.

I know, it's tough to get all excited about working in the gym and eating well. But it remains the best long-term method for building the body you want. It works. And it won't kill you.

Some of the stuff they put in food supplements is downright scary. Putting untested ingredients is not only part of the supplement scam, but it ought to be a crime.

As I alluded to before, there are supplements that work. You can find them here (it's a really short read).

You don't need fancy “blends” or “optimized” proportions. You certainly don't need the multi-color, multi-page “Special Advertisements” hawking such hyperbole.

And you certainly don't need the outrageous prices.

1

How to Consume More Protein Without Supplements

omelet-648197_1280Food supplements can be very expensive. Whey protein powders are all the rage. They're made from milk, are easily digestible, and hit the bloodstream very quickly.

However, they are fairly expensive.

For the guy or gal who wants to build quality, lean muscle mass, the typical guideline is to take in at least 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, preferably 1-1/2 to 2 grams in a mass-building or bulking up phase. Without breaking the bank (and all the banks seem to be broken right now, yes?), you can consume this much protein only by consuming a ton of milk (see these two articles, “Gallon of Milk a Day” program and GOMAD), beef, poultry, fish and… …the incredible, edible EGG.

How to Consume More Protein Without Supplements

Eggs are a complete protein, containing all the “essential” amino acids, and provide about 6 grams per egg. As far as food goes, eggs offer the highest “biological value” protein there is (this is a fancy way of saying that the protein is easily assimilated by the body). In short, eggs are a MUST HAVE menu item! Especially if you're laying off on the expensive supplements. But how do you eat enough eggs to make a difference? Hard boil them.

Here's How to Hard Boil an Egg

  • Take a dozen eggs and a really big pot mostly filled with water.
  • Place your oven on high. Put in the eggs and bring to a boil.
  • Once the water is boiling, cook the eggs for 10-12 minutes.
  • Then, pour out the water, replace with cold water and let stand for 15-30 minutes.
  • Refrigerate.

Now, you can eat these just as they are (without the shell, of course) or you can add them to virtually anything, like salads, sandwiches, and as additions to your meals and snacks.

If you're trying to add weight, eat them whole and eat 2 eggs with every snack. That will get you 6 eggs a day, or an extra 36 grams of protein per day.

This, in effect, replaces about one protein shake a day.

Of course, your snacks ought to add up to between 20 and 30 grams of protein (depending on body weight), so you'll have to supplement with milk. Lots of it!

In fact, to get to 20 grams per snack, you'll have to eat 2 eggs plus one 8-ounce glass of milk.

All other things being equal, you can replace 3/4 of a cup of milk with each egg while on the GOMAD program. Which means that you can really cut back on your milk consumption! (This is a good thing, for the most part.)

Alternatively, you can keep drinking your gallon of milk a day PLUS the eggs and you'll gain more weight than ever before. If you do spring for some whey protein powder, you'll be even farther ahead of the pack.

In the “old days,” trainers like Vince Gironda prescribed dozens of eggs a day for his pupils during their mass-building phases (3 to 6 weeks at a time, tops, plus every 4th day, go to a regular diet — see Cycling for more information on this important concept). Eggs seem to have an extraordinary anabolic effect on the body, increasing growth hormone production, and driving your gains like crazy. A few notes:

  • Eat the whole egg. Don't throw anything but the shell out.
  • Space your meals to be 2 hours or so apart.
  • If you do use food supplements, invest in digestive enzymes. Eating more than a couple eggs a day gives a lot of people some serious gas problems. The aid in digestion is worth the money. Your co-workers will thank you, too.
  • Don't fall for the “organic” nonsense with eggs. There is no proof that there is any difference between eggs produced by chickens in pens, free range, no hormones, or “extra hormones.” I have this theory: Chickens fed growth hormones probably pass those hormones to their eggs and consequently to those who eat them.

I do believe you can make serious gains without supplements. However, like anabolic steroids, you can “get there” faster with supplements.

bodybuilder guy

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